News

Ramport Studios gets historic landmark plaque

Ramport, The Who’s old recording studio in Thessaly Road, Battersea, south London finally got a green plaque last week after campaigning from local artist Brian Barnes, MBE (above, holding the plaque) who originally proposed the idea back in 2011 to Wandsworth Borough Council, to commemorate such an historic location. The only problem was that no-one in the Council had any idea who the current owner was! After six years of searching records the owner was finally tracked down.

Say Brian, “My friend in Battersea Power Station Community Group, Keith Garner found the owner, gained permission and instructed placement on the wall.”

The Battersea Power Station Community Group is an action group formed in 1983 to  . . . “ensure that their views were represented and to make sure that local people benefited from any new use in terms of jobs and facilities and that traffic to and from the building was not to the detriment of the area. Since then the community group has met every month and has been extremely active in criticising the proposals that have been put forward, and in promoting more viable alternative uses for the building.”

Brian Barnes has painted several murals in the Battersea area including The Good, the Bad and the Ugly aka The Battersea Mural on Battersea Bridge Road in 1976 and the Violette Szabo mural in Stockwell (2001). He is currently in the process of painting a mural in Thessaly Road celebrating the history of the local area including Keith Moon with his children’s zebra crossing, the Battersea lavender fields, the Sopworth Camel plane, the munitions factory and Pink Floyd’s inflatable pig over the Power Station. Assisting him on this Herculean task is artist Morganico, whose dad was one of the original carpenters working at Ramport studios in the early 1970s building speaker cabinets and sound-proof walls. The mural can be seen at 189 Carey Gardens, between Thessally Road and Union Road.

In 1973  Keith Moon backed a campaign to have a pedestrian crossing installed to help children safely cross the road due to the high number of road accidents involving children in Thessaly Road. He took on the role of lollipop man and stopped the traffic whilst the children carried out their protest.

Ramport Studios was built in an old church hall in the early 1970s specifically so that The Who could record their landmark album Quadrophenia there. Supertramp’s Crime of the Century and Judas Priest’s Sin After Sin were also recorded there. In 1978 the video for The Who’s single ‘Who Are You’ was filmed at Ramport. These days the building is used as a doctor’s surgery.

More about Battersea Power Station Community Group here

More about Ramport Studios here

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *